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Joint Sessions

AABB has partnered with related professional organizations on the following joint sessions. We would like to thank these organizations for helping us to provide attendees with unique, high-quality sessions.

The Effect of Apheresis on Medications: A Review
Developments in Transfusion Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO)

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The Effect of Apheresis on Medications: A Review

AABB/ASFA
Category: Therapeutic Apheresis
Keywords: Evidence Based Medical Practices | Patient Safety | Professional Development | Therapeutic Apheresis

The term apheresis is a Greek term and it means “to remove forcibly.” It encompasses many treatment modalities including therapeutic plasma exchange, red cell exchange, lipid apheresis, extracorporeal photopheresis and mononuclear cell collections. While most apheresis practitioners are knowledgeable on the various aspects of apheresis, the effect of apheresis on the pharmacokinetics of different medications is less known. This session will focus on the removal of medications by different apheresis modalities, pharmacokinetics affected by apheresis, and strategies for drug management.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Review apheresis modalities and its physiology as it pertains to medication interaction and clearance.
  • Describe the effect of therapeutic apheresis on the pharmacokinetics of different drugs.
  • Discuss strategies for appropriate drug management.
  • Review anticoagulants and their effects on apheresis treatment.

Program Chair:
Dr. Tina S. Ipe

Houston Methodist Hospital
Houston, TX

Speakers:
Dr. Rami B. Ibrahim, PharmD

Michigan State University College of Osteopathic | Wayne State University School of Medicine
East Lansing, MI

Dr. Tina S. Ipe
Houston Methodist Hospital
Houston, TX

Dr. Sara Shunkwiler, MD
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE

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Developments in Transfusion Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO)

AABB/ISBT
Category: Transfusion Service
Keywords: Evidence Based Medical Practices | Recipient/Patient Hemovigilance - Noninfectious Adverse Events (Transfusion Reactions) | Transfusion Medicine Clinical Practices

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is now recognized to be one of the most frequent causes of serious transfusion-related morbidity and mortality and it can be mitigated or prevented by relatively simple measures. This is the first of two sessions will give an overview of TACO and provide intervention and mitigation strategies while identifying critical gaps in our understanding of the syndrome. This session will focus on the incidence of TACO, current knowledge of its pathophysiology, and recognizing TACO in vulnerable patients. Participants will become better acquainted with the early warning signs of potential TACO and be better able to support awareness of TACO and use of preventive practices among colleagues in their institutions.

An international joint working group including members of the ISBT haemovigilance working party, the International Haemovigilance Network, and AABB has revised the reporting criteria for TACO. The revised definition will contribute to the comparability of data from different hemovigilance systems and countries. More importantly, however, the group hopes to increase awareness of TACO’s contribution to patient morbidity and mortality and foster more timely and accurate TACO diagnoses to prevent its occurrence.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Explain why Transfusion Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is important.
  • Describe the revised international hemovigilance reporting criteria for TACO.
  • Discuss the pathophysiology of TACO. Is it purely a hydrostatic problem?
  • Recognize TACO warning signs, HOT TACO, and full-blown TACO.

Speakers:
Dr. Chester Andrzejewski, Jr., PhD, MD, FCAP

Baystate Health / Baystate Medical Center
Springfield, MA

Dr. Johanna C Wiersum-Osselton
Transfusion Reactions in Patients (TRIP) Dutch National Hemovigilance Office
Leiden, Netherlands

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