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Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells: Collection and Manufacturing Challenges

Please note: AABB reserves the right to make updates to this program.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018
2:00 – 3:00 PM (ET) 7:00 – 8:00 PM (GMT)
Master Program Number: 18EL-316 (see program format numbers below under Registration)

Educational Track: Technical/Clinical
Topic: Transfusion Medicine
Intended Audience: Hospitals, Hospital Blood Banks, Medical Directors, Nurses, Physicians, Resident/Fellow
Teaching Level: Intermediate

Director/Moderator: Erin Meyer, DO, MPH, Assistant Professor of Pathology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine; Medical Director of Apheresis and Assistant Medical Director of Transfusion Services, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
Speakers: Kerry O’Brien, MD, Medical Director Blood Bank, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA and Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Eric Sribnick, MD, PhD, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH

Learning Objectives

After participating in this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Explain what constitutes a massive transfusion in the obstetrical setting.
  • Discuss the use of massive transfusion protocols in managing obstetric hemorrhage.
  • Present evidence of the benefit of antifibrinolytics, specifically tranexamic acid, in managing the bleeding obstetrical patient.

Program Description

Hemorrhage is an unfortunate reality for many clinical situations.  Obstetrical hemorrhage and neurologic trauma represent particularly challenging transfusion emergencies.  They are both fraught with coagulation abnormalities that if not addressed promptly can be catastrophic.

Obstetrical hemorrhage is particularly challenging and remains the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide.  The blood bank plays an important role in the care of these women. There exists the potential for any obstetric patient to require massive transfusion support due to unforeseen circumstances.  Dr. O’Brien will discuss her institutions approach to obstetrical hemorrhage in a variety of clinical settings emphasizing the role of algorithmic blood bank support.  As a pediatric neurosurgeon, Dr. Sribnick has extensive experience in neurologic trauma.  He will discuss the decision support for surgical intervention and the importance of prompt intervention of coagulopathy.

Registration

   Program #
Single Viewer: Live Register18EL-316-2035
Single Viewer: On-Demand Register18EL-316-4035
Group Viewing: Live Register18EL-316-6035
Group Viewing: On-Demand Register18EL-316-8035
Group Viewing: Live & On-Demand Register18EL-316-9935

Speaker Biographies

Dr. Kerry O’Brien is currently the Medical Director of the Blood Bank at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA. After growing up in Massachusetts, Dr. O’Brien graduated from Boston University School of Medicine in 2002 and completed residency in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, WA in 2007. She then served as an attending pathologist at that same hospital for 4 years. She completed her Transfusion Medicine fellowship at Puget Sound Blood Center in Seattle (which is now known as Bloodworks Northwest) in 2012 after leaving the military. Dr. O’Brien has been at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center since 2012, where in addition to her duties as a blood banker, she has been the Clinical Pathology Residency Director since February 2016.

Dr. Eric A. Sribnick is a pediatric neurosurgeon at Nationwide Children’s and principal investigator in the Center for Pediatric Trauma Research. He is also assistant professor of neurological surgery at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Sribnick has published more than 40 research publications, book chapters, reviews and case studies. His research and clinical interests focus on surgical and medical interventions for traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Dr. Sribnick has been recognized by his peers and mentors through many awards and honors, including the American Society for Neurochemistry Young Investigator Award (2004) and the George Tindell Resident Research Award (2012, 2013) from Emory University, where he completed his neurosurgery residency.