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AABB Hemovigilance

Since 2006, AABB has been a leader in the establishment of the US national hemovigilance program, from its beginning as a public-private collaboration for the program design to the implementation of a system to track adverse reactions and incidents associated with blood collection and transfusion. AABB has a role in recipient hemovigilance through the AABB Center for Patient Safety, a component Patient Safety Organization (PSO) of the AABB, the only nationally listed PSO dedicated to transfusion safety. Through collecting and analyzing adverse events in the context of transfusion, trends and best practices can be identified and interventions developed to significantly improve patient care and safety.

Revised TACO Definition for Comment before January 30, 2017

A revision of the ISBT/IHN definition for transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) was launched in 2013. This draft explains the rationale for the revision and contains revised reporting criteria; it is publicly available on the ISBT, IHN and AABB websites for comment through the end of January 2017.  Please direct your comments to Kevin Land, ISBT haemovigilance working party chair (kland@bloodsystems.org) or Jo Wiersum, TACO definition revision group (j.wiersum@tripnet.nl) before 31st January 2017.

AABB coordinates multiple vigilance programs, including the West Nile Virus, Chagas Disease, and Zika Virus Biovigilance Networks and the AABB Blood Survey - a statistically validated survey of blood collection and utilization by the AABB membership.

 AABB Center for Patient Safety – Hemovigilance for Hospitals

The AABB Center for Patient Safety, listed as a component Patient Safety Organization (PSO) of the AABB in December 2008, is dedicated to analyzing data on adverse reactions and incidents associated with blood transfusion, in a confidential and protected environment. The goal of these analyses is to identify and communicate best practices and to design interventions to improve patient safety.

See the list of participating organizations.

The AABB Center for Patient Safety, a component PSO, operates independently of AABB and its accreditation programs.

Center for Patient Safety FAQs

* Patient safety organizations, or PSOs, are organizations dedicated to improving patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 authorizes the creation of PSOs to improve safety and quality through the collection and analysis of data on adverse events and medical errors. By providing legal privilege and confidentiality protections, PSOs create a secure environment where health care providers can report, aggregate, and analyze patient safety data that enable the identification and reduction of risks and hazards associated with patient care.

 Zika Virus Biovigilance Network – Blood Donor Infectious Disease Tracking

The Zika Virus (ZIKV) Biovigilance Network collects and reports data on blood donors with suspected ZIKV infection in the United States and Canada. Data are collected from investigational (IND) donor test results performed by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT). The data are reported to the AABB site by facilities responsible for collecting and/or testing blood donations in the United States.

For additional information, visit Zika Virus Biovigilance Network.

 West Nile Virus Biovigilance Network – Blood Donor Infectious Disease Tracking

The West Nile Virus (WNV) Biovigilance Network collects and reports data on donors (of blood, tissue and hematopoietic progenitor cells) with suspected WNV infection in the United States and Canada. Data are collected from donor screening test results performed by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT). The data are reported to the AABB site by facilities responsible for collecting and/or testing virtually all blood donations in the United States and Canada.

For additional information, visit West Nile Virus Biogivilance Network.

 Chagas Biovigilance Network – Blood Donor Infectious Disease Tracking

The Chagas Disease Biovigilance Network records screening and confirmatory results from the testing of donors for antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease. Current data are being provided by those laboratories that are using tests licensed by FDA to screen blood donors for the T. cruzi antibody. These laboratories account for more than 65 percent of the total blood collected in the U.S.

For additional information, visit Chagas Biovigilance.

 AABB Blood Survey - Blood Donor Infectious Disease Tracking

AABB surveys its members periodically for information about blood collection, blood and blood product transfusion, and patient blood management activities in their facilities. The results of these surveys are used to assist membership in understanding the current trends in blood collection and transfusion and to support continued development of AABB policy positions and informed decision making.

For an update on current survey activity and to view the latest blood survey report, visit AABB Blood Survey.

For more information about participation, contact hemovigilance@aabb.org.

 Donor Hemovigilance

Donor Hemovigilance is defined as the tracking of adverse events associated with blood donation. AABB promotes use of harmonized definitions for adverse events associated with the blood donation process and endorses donor health and safety.

For additional information, visit  Donor Hemovigilance.